Biodynamic Wine

What does it mean to drink on an Fruit Day or Root Day ? Biodynamic wines combine a mix of sustainable agriculture practices – similar to organic growing – with a bit of mysticism. Biodynamic farming was first coined in the 1920’s by Austrian philosopher Rudolph Steiner, but has roots (pun intended) that harken back…

Wine History: Widow Clicquot

The Widow Clicquot, Veuve Clicquot (Veuve is “Widow” in French), built a Champagne empire and transformed the industry. Barbe-Nicole Clicquot (née Ponsardin) was born on December 16, 1777. She married François Clicquot and together they started a Champagne house. François soon died, but instead of transferring the business to others, Barbe-Nicole started running it and…

Tasting Week 1: Taste

The final step in tasting is to actually taste! During one tasting class I was told to take a tiny sip first, followed by a larger sip where you swirl the wine to coat your mouth. For me, swirling the wine in my mouth doesn’t seem to help much, but taking a tiny sip first,…

Tasting Week 1: Smell

The next stage in tasting is to smell the wine. This is the part where you see all these instaworthy swirling photos. To help aerate the wine and release more of the aromas, you want to swirl the glass. This takes some practice so that you don’t end up with wine all over your table,…

Tasting Week 1: Look

After you’ve poured the wine – what’s next? The first step in actually tasting the wine is to look at it. Having your glass be less than half full really helps in this step as a larger pour will mean the wine may appear artificially darker and become harder to assess. Look Tilt the wine…

Tasting Week 1: Pour

Starting basic here, but it really is the first thing you need to know: when tasting wine, you only want to pour a small amount. You should not fill the glass to the brim. Not only does this make it difficult to remember the taste and analyze the wine (I’ll cover spit buckets another day),…

Welcome to Couch2Rosé

Join me on a journey to learn about wine. Like with any training program, the key to becoming an expert is to start at the beginning and go slow. Through my studies have found that learning about wine also means learning about culture, viticulture, viniculture, vinification, politics, history, food, and, of course, wine. I am…